UNFORTUNATELY WE ARE GETTING OLDER AND ARE NOW RETIRED AND THIS LITTER OF JAPANESE BOBTAILS WILL BE OUR LAST.  WE DEARLY LOVE OUR JBT's AND WILL MISS HAVING THE BABIES WHO ARE SUCH FUN! 

WE ARE HANDING OVER THE REINS TO TANIA HAY IN TASMANIA. PLEASE CONTACT US FOR CONTACT DETAILS FOR TANIA.

 

            OUR JAPANESE BOBTAILS

            AS SEEN ON BETTER HOMES & GARDENS

            APPEARED IN THE NOVEMBER 2010 EDITION OF

           PETS MAGAZINE

Trilian Cattery sincerely thanks:

Yuki-Usagi Cattery in Japan and its owner Yukiko Terashima
www.geocities.jp/cattery_yukiusagi

Goutokuji Cattery in America and its owner Kathy Lawson
www.goutokuji.com

Japanese Bobtail Cats

Japanese Bobtail Cats

 

The earliest written evidence of cats in Japan indicates that they arrived from China or Korea at least 1,000 years ago. In 1602, Japanese authorities decreed that all cats should be set free to help deal with rodents threatening the silk-worms. Buying or selling cats was illegal, and from then on, bobtailed cats lived on farms and in the streets. Japanese Bobtails ("JBT") thus became the "street cats" of Japan.

Maneki-nekoManeki-nekoThe maneki-neko ("beckoning cat"), a JBT seated with one paw raised, is considered a good-luck charm. A maneki-neko statue is often found in the front of Japanese stores or homes beckoning customers and friends inside. A raised right paw supposedly attracts money, while a raised left paw attracts customers.

Legend

There is a legend in Japan about why the Japanese Bobtail lost its tail. It states that a cat was warming itself too close to a fire, and set its tail on fire. It then ran through the town, burning many buildings to the ground. As punishment, the Emperor decreed that all cats should have their tails cut off.

What are they like?

JBT's are charming, affectionate, intelligent and loyal. They are athletic, active, and very playful (some even enjoy playing in water). They are talkative but with a quiet voice. The tail of JBT's is unique - no two tails are alike. They come in a variety of shapes, bunny tail, corkscrew, shaving brush, some longer (less than 7.6cm though) some shorter.; Some tails are rigid, some aren't, some can be wiggled, some can 't. The tail is as unique as a fingerprint. When a JBT is playing or talking to you they quite often waggle their little tail - Noel does this all the time.

JBT's are very healthy and are sturdy, tough little cats with no genetically linked defects having been reported in this breed.

JBT's are generally good travellers, adaptable to most situations, are good with other animals. JBT's are especially fond of children as they do not tire easily!

Appearance

JBT's have a coat that is soft and silky and of medium length - totally different from a Siamese coat which is short, smooth and like satin. The JBT coat is quite plush and very easy to get used to stroking! They generally start purring when petted and have a very quiet little purr. JBT's shed very little fur.

JBT's come in just about every colour except chocolate or lavender and the Himalayan pattern (Siamese type marking) or un-patterned agouti (Abyssinian colouring). The most popular colour and supposedly lucky colour is the Mi-ke (pronounced "mee-kay") meaning "three furred" or "tricolour". All Mi-ke kittens (like Calico kittens) are female. A Mi-ke is predominantly a white cat with bright dramatic patches of red and black. Honoka is a Mi-ke.

The majority of JBT cats are bi-colours which can be white and red (like Noel) or black and white. Other possibilities are tabby and white, tortoiseshell and solid colours.

JBT's are a medium sized cat, slender but muscular - you seldom see a fat JBT. Females tend to be 2.27 to 3.18kgs and males 3.18 to 4.55kgs. The body is long but not tubular like the Siamese. Looking at the cat from the side it should give a square appearance.

A JBT Queen usually has a litter of three to four kittens that are vigorous and large at birth and mature quickly.

Roronoa on the left is a blue eyed Seal pointed kitten

Roronoa as an adult - isn't he gorgeous!